Tagged: sick

Mug of War

Mug of War

It was early in the morning and since Mommy had just left for work, it was time for Daddy to take the stage for my daily variety show. Although I’ve been known to perform intimate acoustic Disney-song concerts, reproduce Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” on the Magna Doodle, and even regularly scare the robotic tigers my son has imagined into existence back into “other houses, but not this house,” I was feeling especially wiped out on this particular morning. The Twins had just gotten over a nasty cold, and had so generously shared it with me, so as I sleepily hacked up a lung, I decided I needed a power-up and fired up our Keurig (arguably the best purchase we have made as new parents). And yes, I realize that coffee is not a fantastic idea when one has a cold, as it discourages hydration, but when one is accustomed to caffeine every morning, one is inclined to not pile the withdrawal headache on top of fiery sinuses and a gravelly throat. So there.

“Daddy?” my daughter half-whined. “You come play in my room?”

This is a new fun game I play with my daughter. She recently has become enamored with the novelty of playing with all of her toys with Daddy in her room. So much so, in fact, that every moment of every day I am home with them, my presence is requested in her room.

This, of course, would be fine if I didn’t have another child who expects an equal amount of Daddy’s attention. But I do, and there are times when I’m in the middle of building a perfectly-scaled replica of Mount Rushmore with Duplos with my son, or helping him line up his beloved “sea treatures” on the floor by species, and can’t just drop everything to “go play in her room.”

Help!And so I tell her “No,” invariably triggering a hissy fit which lasts way longer than it needs to. In fact, just the other day, I was rocking The Beatles’ Help! on vinyl at my son’s request (yeah, he’s pretty awesome), and in the middle of the opening title track, my little girl invited me to play in her room. After I explained that Daddy and Brother were busy doing Awesome Things, she staged a very vocal protest spanning almost all of Side A. On a side-note, my resilient son didn’t let the screaming infringe upon his Beatlemania, and he just kept literally dancing circles around his sister as she kicked and punched the floor.

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Things I Did This Weekend: A Non-Exhaustive List

1. Woke up at 3am both mornings to rescue the Twins from drowning in a sea of their own mucus, caused by a recent onslaught of sickness.

2. Wiped tiny noses every thirty seconds, literally working through six boxes of tissues.

3. Wiped tiny squirts of child cold medicine defiantly spat at me off my face every four to six hours.

4. Listened to my washing machine suddenly start playing dubstep mid-cycle, culminating in a crash and sudsy water pooling below it.

My washing machine needs potty training

I told it three times to let me know if it needed to go potty.

5. Helped my wife scour the Pseudonymous Family’s vast collection of receipts and instruction booklets for the washing machine’s warranty information, continually chasing down toddlers who took off running with unsearched piles, wiping their noses on them.

6. Worked during too-short naptimes and into the wee hours of the night on a National Science Foundation research grant proposal that is due Wednesday and nowhere near done.

7. Got my son to repeat “My Precious” several times after he woke up from a nap with a raspy, swollen-sinus voice that made him sound exactly like Gollum. Which made it all worth it.

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Tigger Photobomb

Lesser Known Things Tiggers Do Best: A Non-Exhaustive List

1. Managing personal finances

2. Remembering whether or not they are running out of milk at home

3. Creating iTunes playlists for road trips

4. Knowing the name of that one actor in that one movie you are talking about

5. Saving seats for you in the movie theater that are not behind the tall guy with a head the size of Jack in the Box’s CEO’s

6. Photobombing

Tigger Photobomb

Man, Eeyore just can’t catch a break.

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Fecal Gotee

Let’s Get Sh!tfaced, Part Deux Deux

There’s no gentle way to say this–I can smell the difference between my son and daughter’s fecal matter.

I could describe their distinct aromas for you in gag-reflex-inducing detail, but have chosen not to in case you are currently eating, or plan to ever again. (After all, you should never bite the hand that reads you.)

Not sure how many of you know this, but I am a world class dishwasher. This is not due to any concerted effort on my part–I’ve just wound up logging my 10,000 hours since the Twins’ birth, conquering mountains of soiled bottles, Sippy Cups, and high-chair trays on a tri-daily basis.

Kitchen Drain

Every once in a while, I try to fish some of those hours out of here. This one time, I came really close.

Thus, on the morning of the Twincident in question, I had stealthily ducked into the kitchen to knock out the breakfast dishes. Despite both having nasty colds and ear infections, the Twins were in excellent spirits having just been fed, and babbled baby limericks at each other while surveying the playroom toyscape. Since the Twins made their outside-of-Mommy debut, we rarely have more than two minutes to eat human-style at a proper table anyway, so we chose to convert our house’s “dining room” to a playroom, which has worked swimmingly at moments like this, when I can watch them in the next room while still actively pursuing 20,000 hours.

Having successfully sanitized the load’s umpteenth and umptieth items, I Deion-Sanders-High-Stepped from the sink to the playroom threshold.

And that’s when it hit me.

The Wall of Stank.

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A Tale of Two Cities Engraving

A Tale of Two Sicknesses

It was the worst of times, it was the worstest of times, it was the age of projectile sneezing, it was the age of irrepressible coughing, it was the epoch of mucus, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was okay to use improper grammar while parodying famous literature, because it was hilarious, it was the summer of insomnia, it was the summer of despair, we had everything before us, we had viruses after us, we were all going direct to the doctor, we were all going direct to the pharmacy—in short, the period was so far from the present period, that some of its noisiest Twinfants insisted on its being blogged, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of awesomeness only.

For most of the month of June, my house was baby cold central. As I’ve mentioned previously (in Don’t Fear the Teether, and Think of the Children), my daughter was under the weather, forecasted by my wife and I as thundering storm clouds looming along the Pseudonymous front, and when the storm finally broke, it did, in fact, ignite several torrential weeks of snot-rocket downpours—from both kids.

A Tale of Two Cities Engraving

The Battle of Snot-Rocket Hill (Actual Photograph)

I realize, O Loyal Reader, that by not following up on this storyline, I’ve left you with a cliffhanger as agonizing as a television-season-ending shocker, and that you’ve been waiting with bated breath for updates on my daughter’s state. For that I offer my sincerest apologies, and humbly ask you to put away that guillotine. Ironically, part of the reason for it is because so much has been happening since then that is worthy of sharing, but the all-consuming nature of caring for ailing Twinfants has kept me so busy that I have not had time (or, let’s face it, the energy) to chronicle these stories. But fear not. That ends right here and now, as Twinfamy has been “recalled to life” and returns to pseudo-continuity. In fact, this Twincident picks up right where Think of the Children left off, on the following day, a Monday.

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Week the First – The Snot Still Rises

We had suspected my daughter of having a cold, and after visiting the doctor (for the second time in two weeks), it was confirmed.

McAfee VirusScan

I'm totally getting a refund.

“Looks like it’s viral,” our doctor reported, sporting the winning smile with which she breaks bad news, “So there isn’t much to do in terms of antibiotics or other prescriptions. Unfortunately, you’ll just have to ride this one out. Can you do that for me, little girl?” she asked my daughter, who—oh yeah, had been SCREAMING in protest for the last ten minutes while being examined.

My daughter paused a moment, blinked at the unexpected stimulus, and glared with recognition at the stranger who had just been poking at her while all she really wanted was Daddy to hold her, as if to say, Sleep with one eye open, tonight b!tch. She erupted again, drenching herself in a fresh concoction of tears and boogers. Poor baby girl.

“Some things you can try,” the doctor hollered over the tiny soprano, “are a humidifier, elevating her mattress, using saline nasal drops and extracting mucus with a bulb, and Tylenol if the fevers come back. Oh, and a little cowbell can’t hurt either,” she winked.

Well, my wife and I are kind of a big deal, so we’d already been doing all of these, and when I asserted our greatness, the doctor glowed. “Of course you are! You guys are so good. You’re doing a great job, Dad!” Aw, shucks.

I tried to remember this while braving the five-day scream-fest that ensued, as I split my attention between a miserable daughter who wanted nothing but to be held every second, and a son who became jealously aware of this about thirty seconds after I did. However, Daddy tender-love-and-cared the hell out of them both and we saw my daughter finally feeling better and returning to her happy, bubbly self by Saturday.

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Week the Second – Calm in Storm

Chuck Norris

If you knew what was in it, it wouldn't be awesome anymore, would it? It's my job to keep it that way. Don't make my beard come over there.

My daughter had beaten the snot out of her cold and had even taken its lunch money. As an added bonus, my son didn’t show any signs of catching it, either.

This week was drenched in Awesome Sauce, the ingredients for which have been shrouded in mystery for decades, despite tireless attempts by the world’s leading scientists and culinary experts. (Some speculate that Chuck Norris enforces its secrecy, but not out loud. That’s just asking for trouble.)

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Week the Third – The Substance of the Nostril

Suddenly, out of nowhere (well, actually, his nostrils), my son began sneeze-launching cloud-white, stringy boogers and coughing uncontrollably. Some friends were visiting us that day, so we joked that he might be allergic to them while they were here, and seriously considered it once they left. The Twins had been sleeping from 7 pm to 5 am consistently prior to the sneeze-a-thon, but that night, we were reminded this was a newfound luxury as he woke up hourly, drowning in a salty sea of his own mucus.

Oddly, the next morning he was fine, as if nothing had happened—as if it were all a bad dream, very much akin to my unintelligent former seventh grader students’ thrilling short story resolutions. It quickly turned back into a nightmare, however, around 3 pm, when mucus-bearing missiles again assaulted my unsuspecting daughter and me. After another night of insomnia, a disheveled, zombie version of myself brought him to the doctor AGAIN, for our fourth visit in three weeks.

“Well, hello again!” Dr. RainbowsSunshineAndPinkBunnyRabbits beamed.

Menchie's Punch Card

It's genius, I tell you. Genius.

“So, I really think you should do a punch card promotion,” I enthused. “You know, like at a frozen yogurt place? I mentioned it to the receptionist, but she was not very receptive.”

She once again went through her anatomical surveillance procedure. Lungs, ears, temperature, cabin air filter, windshield wiper fluid—all good. Since both my wife and I have endured terrible allergies our whole lives, I consider myself an expert on all things allergy–a connoisseur if you will–and thus was pretty convinced my son was having an allergic reaction, possibly to our visitors or something outside. In retrospect, I had correlated both of his sneezing fits with bringing him outdoors. He loves to look at trees, so we’d been watching the ones in our backyard sway in the breeze just before my peeps showed up, and then the next day, I brought him out with me to check on the installation of a new windshield on my automobile. (Some bastard was hauling gravel in a pickup on the freeway and a piece chipped the glass right in my eyeline. It’s okay, though, because it was free. LikeagoodneighborStateFarmisthere!)

I knew I’d be asked about my son’s recent medical history, so I pulled my trusty ukulele out of the diaper bag and launched into “The Ballad of the Possible Allergy to Something Outside,” a twelve-minute opus I’d composed for the occasion, outlining all of the above. However, mid-seventh verse (just before it really starts to pick up) she politely stopped me to say something I did not know, which I will share with you because you are worthy: Since allergies are your body’s immune system rejecting certain things (which I DID know), you need a fully developed immune system to exhibit allergic reactions. However, babies don’t reach this point until 12-15 months out (which I did NOT know). Upon sharing this with our families, my wife’s mother–a practicing OB/GYN–swore she’d already told us this several days ago. We had no recollection, but if it was, in fact, said, I offered a speculative reason for our non-responsiveness. “But you weren’t wearing one of those white coats and a stethoscope when you said it.”

In the end, it turned out that my son had acquired his first cold, but not from my daughter, since he caught it so much later after she’d shaken hers. So again, we employed the same measures taken to heal my daughter just a few weeks hence, with Daddy iron-manning his way into a Daytime Emmy Nomination, sweating through several t-shirts a day and replenishing these precious bodily fluids by valiantly imbibing Samuel Adams Summer Ale once Mommy got home.

Soon (but not soon enough), by the middle of…

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Week the Fourth – The Viruses Die Out Forever

…the viruses appeared to have died out forever.

Victorious, my son, daughter and I ceremoniously danced on their graves, mirthfully firing baby formula into the air. Later that day, right in the middle of Tummy Time, I received a personal call from President Obama on a Fisher Price Chatter Telephone, congratulating me on my victory.

NOW ON THE LINE - President Barack Obama via Fisher Price Chatter Telephone

"Just doing my duty as a father, Mr. President... Yes, I did say 'duty'... Yeah, it is a funny word, isn't it?"

My wife and I had survived the Twins’ first colds, and now have one less item on our “What the Hell Are We Going to Do When That Happens?” List.  (Remaining items include “My Daughter Starting to Date” and “Oh Sh!t, They Can Reach the Counter.”)

And although it was a trying period, I never once considered seeking out a ne’er-do-well doppelganger to take my place, because whenever I think about being a father, I invariably conclude that it is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better experience that I am having than I have ever known.

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Author Commentary

A 500-Disc DVD Special Edition Bonus Feature

To commemorate the Five-Minute Anniversary of this Twincident, Twinfamy decided to do something special–a Behind-the-Scenes, Making-Of commentary, intended to be read simultaneously with the post itself, similar to the auditory director commentary of a motion picture.

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

Inaugural Selection, Twinfamy's Book Club

This post alludes heavily to Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities, one of my favorite novels. If you’ve never read it or were assigned to read it but only pretended to (like I did in high school the first time around) and don’t “get” why I worded things in a certain old-timey way, that’s probably why. However, I do recommend it and hereby make it the first official selection in Twinfamy’s Book Club, a tradition I am igniting because Oprah is a quitter. In fact, it can be read on your worldwide interweb device here. Go ahead. I’ll wait.

Additionally, I do realize, O Loyal Reader, this Twincident is lengthier than usual, and yes, because it borrows from literature, is more high-brow than usual. But don’t worry, I still have plenty of poop and fart jokes up my sleeve (or another body part) and will be pulling them out in due time.

Or “doo” time.

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You may also enjoy:

Don't Fear the Teether   Think of the Children!   We Don't Do That Here - A Trip to the Pediatrician's Office

If not, it’s no reason to cut anyone’s head off.

5 Hour Energy

Think of the Children!

My wife, who was valiantly driving the entire Pseudonymous clan home, pointed out the passenger-side window.  I perked up from an inevitable doze and glanced in that direction, but found nothing of interest.  While I was trying to make something up about how, yeah, they should really fix that pothole–think of the children!–so as to not ignore her, she elaborated.  Kind of.

“No, the thing.”  This is what happens when my wife gets tired.  She loses the capacity to communicate verbally.  She had initially opted for a completely nonverbal interaction (the pointing), and I knew that this helpful-yet-cryptic verbal qualifier took a concerted extra effort on her part, so I was thankful for that.  (That may appear to be sarcasm, but it’s not.  I really did appreciate it knowing how drained she was.)

It had been a grueling Sunday.  We’d planned to cart our travelling circus to Grandma’s house, but did not plan on waking up at 2:30 a.m. for my son’s teething emergency, which in turn made him realize he was hungry, which in turn made him realize it was kind-of-almost-but-not-really morning and a phenomenal opportunity to hold an animated roundtable discussion with Mommy and Daddy regarding such hard-hitting issues as “Dah-gaah,” “Nn-gee,” and “Naaaaah!”

As we futilely attempted to recover from our guest appearance on our son’s late-night talk show, we had also been keeping an eye on our poor, ailing daughter, whose fever—despite a steady clanging of more cowbell—had returned after what we thought was a few days of relief.  With it came bonus features like labored coughing, booger mustaches, and projectile sneezing (now with 50% more slime!).  Quite certain our daughter had acquired her first cold, we planned a return to the pediatrician the following day.  We just needed to make it until then.

I now followed my wife’s finger more closely, and realized she was pointing at the pocket in the car door (is there a name for that thing?), inside which was our emergency stash of 5 Hour Energy.  “Oh, right,” I eureka-ed.  The Case of the Pointing Finger had been solved!

5 Hour Energy

The Secret Weapon

As I’ve mentioned before, the exhaustion of raising the Twinfants often makes the drive home worthy of such feats as self-inflicted face slapping, high-volume externalization of one’s inner monologue (“Don’t you dare fall asleep!  Think of the children!”), and the occasional power-up beverage.  My wife and I have massacred the drive home time and time again with 5 Hour Energy and have dubbed it the Secret Weapon, with permanent installations in both of our vehicles.  While taste is not one of its virtues (“Berry” is our favored flavor), we can’t deny its effectiveness.  You can literally feel the energy coursing through you after drinking it. (Find out why in this post’s 500-Disc DVD Special Edition Bonus Feature below.)

Of course, in the heart of the scorching Arizona summer–during which we brave 100° F-plus temperatures like nobody’s bidness–a parked car creates a microwave-like atmosphere, scalding everything in its path and tragically damaging any forgotten chocolate into feces-like masses that do taste the same, but not really.  We love our coffee piping hot, but we do not feel the same way about 5 Hour Energy.  It is best choked-down cold, with a remark to the effect of, “It’s not that bad, I guess.”

However, today, our automobile had greenhoused our Secret Weapon to what felt like 150° F as it radiated in my now-trembling hand.

“Um, it’s pretty hot.”

“Do you want me to stay awake or not?”

“All right,” I muttered, unsheathing it from its tamper-safe wrapper and removing the lid.

“Is it gonna burn my mouth?”

“Don’t think so.”

“Will you check?”

“How?”  Yes, I actually said this.  Parental exhaustion has sparked a new brand of idiot conversation for both of us.  We sometimes become worse at making inferences than my former seventh grade students.

“By drinking it,” she duh-ed.

Clint Eastwood

Clint Eastwood is said to carry sunshine in a bag. Convenient.

“Oh, right.”  I menacingly stared down my aqueous adversary as the stereotypical whistling score of a Clint Eastwood Old West showdown came from the back seat.  “Thanks, kids,” I said, remarkably unfazed by my four-month-old twins’ newfound whistling abilities and knowledge of American cinema.

Especially during my wife’s double-barreled pregnancy, more seasoned parents made a point to warn me, “Your life is no longer your own.”  Although I’m fairly new at this, I feel the stereophonic nature of my status as a parent warranted me a full understanding of this early on.  And as I “Eye-of-the-Tiger-ed” myself for the courage to imbibe this infernal concoction, I reminded myself that parents must often endure obstacles they would not normally expose themselves to, for the good and safety of their offspring.  Think of the children! I thought.

I tipped the tiny bottle back and took a miniature, fiery swig.  While its temperature was, in fact, at a tongue-worthy level, its taste was very much not.

“Oh.  God.  It’s… so bad…”

“Hot?”

“No, not hot…”

She pulled the bottle from my hand.  “It can’t be that bad.”  In she plunged, taking in full gulps.  Her hand suddenly jerked forward, yanking it from her now-grimacing mouth and staring at it as if it had b!tch-slapped her.  “Okay, yeah.  It’s that bad.”

Then she looked me in the eye before adding, “But I’m exhausted.”  She went back for round two, tipping it completely upside-down in her mouth.

I love this woman.

She finished half of it, and handed it back.  “I only need two and a half hours of energy.  Then, it’s bedtime.”

I don’t know why, but sometimes when something tastes particularly unfavorable, there’s a backwards sort of allure to it.  On the surface, the expression “This is terrible.  Here, taste it.” does not make any sense at all, but for some reason, we still taste.  That fascination—paired with the fact that I, too, needed to be operational for the next two and a half hours—culminated in a full-on chug of the remaining “Energy.”

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Seven Hours Later…

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“I don’t understand.  If it’s 5 Hour Energy and we split it, how are we still awake?”

“Shh!  I think they heard you!”

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Additional Twinformation About 5 Hour Energy
(Amaze Your Friends!)

A 500-Disc DVD Special Edition Bonus Feature

It should first be noted, O Loyal Reader, that in no way is this post intended to knock the 5 Hour Energy product.  While its taste is not the most stellar in the caffeinated beverage family, its efficacy is indisputable, and we depend on it for that reason.  We just don’t recommend serving it scalding unless absolutely necessary, as demonstrated here.  We also do not recommend it for daily guzzling, or, for that matter (again) unless absolutely necessary.  Here’s why.

While my wife and I laid awake that night, we whispered sweet nothings in each other’s ear wondering what the hell makes it so effective.  I crept to the kitchen in ninja mode–hurdling every couch and Exersaucer in my path–to get a bottle, and here’s what we found on the back:

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5 Hour Energy Ingredients

Actual Supplement Facts for 5 Hour Energy

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Then, we did the math.  If my wife and I split a bottle, we shared an impressive 8333% of the daily recommended amount of Vitamin B12, or 4166.5% each. This means that, having drank it on Sunday, June 5, we technically do not need to worry about our B12 intake again until 41.665 days from then, which will be July 17.  We found this dosage just a little excessive, and are glad we usually only drink a few gulps, versus the whole frickin’ thing.

That being said, the verdict: way better Secret Weapon than daily wake-up agent.

You heard it here first.

Unless you already knew it.

But I heard it here first.

So there.

More Cowbell

Don’t Fear the Teether

Walken-Cowbell

THE Bruce Dickinson, whose work has spawned the now-common cowbell remedy.

If you read Tuesday’s Captwin’s Log, you learned about my mutinous daughter’s escapades. It turns out that her behavior was not due to my own incompetence (Yay!)–it’s because she was teething and feverish (Boo!). Having figured this out, I scoured my memory for any folk wisdom relevant to the situation. I once heard that the only prescription for a fever is more cowbell, but I wasn’t so sure about that, so I decided to consult my pediatrician.

So, upon gratefully entrusting my son to his aunt’s capable hands, Wednesday morning I took my daughter to the doctor and the doctor said, “No more monkeys jumping on the bed!” Which I thought was a rather odd (and brusque) response. It turned out that she was confusing my daughter with another patient, one of five quintuplets who took an unfortunate spill while jumping on a bed, cracking his cranium on impact.  Having sorted out the monkey business, we moved on to my daughter.

We love our doctor.  She has a constant smile and always appears to be in a fantastic mood, but not at all in an annoying way–you can tell it’s genuine.  As first-(and-I-guess,-second)-time parents, we’re aware–but can’t help–that we come in with a certain unbridled rookie intensity, and our pediatrician takes that in stride, making a point to reassure us of the phenomenal job we’re doing.

“So what’s going on today?” she smiled.  “I usually only see my twins for well visits, since you and Mom do such a great job.”  See?  Love it.  ALL people in the service industry, take note.

She consulted my daughter’s charts as I gave an animated play-by-play of the past 24 hours, apologizing for the crudity of my props and set design, for I had not had optimal preparation time: We had noticed she was flush and uncharacteristically warm last night, with especially red ears. Earlier that morning her fever had spiked to 100.4° F before we bought her a round of Tylenol with a breast milk/formula cocktail to chase.  Additionally, she (and her brother) have been exhibiting all the signs of teething: gushes of drool resembling transparent, wet gotees; the gnawing of any appendage, corner, toy, or Nook Color in a one-foot radius (Don’t worry–my Nook is okay.  I know you were concerned.); and a particular preference for objects of the arctic persuasion, such as fridge-cooled teething rings, wet rags, ice sculptures, Coldplay, etc.  Suddenly realizing I had painstakingly chronicled yesterday’s events already, I offered to read my previous blog entry aloud for her and even autograph a printout, but she respectfully declined in favor of actually examining the patient, which was probably a good call, backed by years of medical training.

More Cowbell

Gene, former cowbellist of Blue Oyster Cult, demonstrates proper form.

Having inspected my daughter’s vitals and crevices, she looked up. “Well, I am a little concerned about the fever. Have you tried cowbell?”

“Yes!  Yes, we have!  That was the first thing we tried!”

She nodded.  “Excellent!  Great work, Dad!  Okay, well, obviously, that didn’t solve the problem.  So then, when that didn’t work, did you try more cowbell?”

“As a matter of fact, we did.  We attempted both the initial cowbell and then more cowbell.”

“Good, good,” she nodded, scribbling notes on the chart.

“Well,” she continued, “She’s definitely teething, but it doesn’t look like she’s quite ready to cut a tooth.” I cringed–not because of the news itself, but because of the expression “cutting a tooth.”  I’d heard it before, each utterance more excruciating than the last.  It’s just ridiculous.  It’s not the tooth that’s being cut–it’s the gums.  Yet, everyone has agreed upon this atrocity.  It’s right up there with “I could care less.”  No, you mean you could NOT care less.  I was appalled to hear a medical professional committing such a crime against linguistics–there must be something Latin to say instead.  However, given the circumstances, I decided it was best to bite my tongue.  (But not with teeth that have ever been “cut.”  I’ll stand firm on at least that.)

“So the reason I wanted you to come in today is because when a fever spikes like this, without other noticeable symptoms, it could mean an infection. Usually it’s an ear infection, but her ears look okay.”

I cringed, this time actually, yes, because of the news.  I was plagued with ear infection after ear infection as an infant, many of which were not even diagnosed, until my poor mother–a pharmacist–persisted that I’d been clawing my pudgy hands at my ears for days, shrieking in pain.  Doctors later discovered they were not discovering the infections because I have unusually  narrow Eustachian tubes–so narrow that they envelop infections in an Invisibility Cloak.  To this day, I must still insist–especially with new doctors–to re-examine my history if I am ever to receive the antibiotics necessary for salvation from the vice clamped around my head.  I am hoping to dodge this tiny bullet with my children and knew my daughter would first need to be a repeat ear-symptom offender before validating it.

“I learned something today.”

Then the doctor said something I will share with you, O Loyal Reader, in case you encounter this situation with your own progeny, because I, like Kyle Broflovskli of South Park, learned something that day.

“Occasionally–especially with a little girl–it could mean she has a urinary tract infection (UTI)…”

Now, this is mainly for the guys since they don’t have the equipment of their own to maintain, but it’s very important when changing a diaper to apply the axiom “wipe front to back,” particularly in sanitizing feminine parts.  (This principle actually applies well to people all ages and genders.  You’re welcome.)  Unfortunately, due to the nature of wearing excrement in a to-go bag, infection does still occasionally happen.  Like most things, I insist with my wife how awe-inspiring I am upholding this guideline regardless of actual skill.

A suspenseful swell of foreboding violin strings crescendoed as the pediatrician continued.  “…but her lady parts look just fine, too.”

“Score!”  I fist-bumped my daughter.

“Nn-Gaaah?” she tittered.

With all that in mind, I was advised to monitor Our Princess’s temperature and continue with the Tylenol if it got high, cowbell at the ready.  A few days’ vigil saw her temperature returning to normal and an resurgence of her ecstatic self.

Then, over the weekend came the snorting, coughing and projectile sneezing…

Twinfamy Batman LogoWill Our Little Princess emerge victorious from this biological battle?  Will the affliction spread to other unfortunate members of the Pseudonymous bloodline, culminating in the full onslaught of a zombie apocalypse 28 days later?  Has our family cowbell’s efficacy diminished due to faulty manufacturing and/or a long-past expiration date?

For the shocking revelations of these and countless other unanswered questions in the Twinfamy Saga, tune in for the next electrifying Twincident, same twinternet site, same (or entirely different) twin-time!

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Additional Twinformation for New Parents

A 500-Disc DVD Special Edition Bonus Feature

Handy and/or Dandy Baby Fever Chart

If you baby is… Call your doctor when…
Less than 3 months old temperature is 100.4° F (38° C) or higher
3 to 6 months old temperature is 101° F (38.3° C) or higher
6 months or old temperature is 103° F (39.4° C) or higher
a werewolf it changes back to human form (easier to get into car seat)

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Tylenol

For most babies under 6 months, Tylenol is the pain reliever/fever reducer most doctors recommend.  The active ingredient in Tylenol is acetaminophen.  I’m telling you this because you can often save a few bucks by finding the generic version, which usually says “acetaminophen” in bigger letters than “compare to Tylenol.”  You can use these few bucks to buy yourself a drink, which will taste really good once your sick child has fallen asleep and has finally stopped crying.

Fellow rookie parents: Consult your own physician for proper Tylenol dosage–it depends on your child’s weight.

Rebellious rookie parents: You are so undeniably cool!  Teach me to be like you!  BUT, while play by your own rules and live on the edge and whip your hair back and forth and whatnot, please don’t make your baby a wild child when it comes to medicine.  The label says not to administer it more often than every 4-6 hours for a reason, so please follow the rules just this once.  Don’t worry about your rep.  I won’t tell anyone.  I’m not even looking.