Tagged: improv

Child Safety Latch

Adventures in Baby-Proofing: Part 1 – There Will Be Blood

Child Safety Latch

You never hear people say “I’d rather be installing child safety locks on my cabinets.”

I wanted to finish baby-proofing our house earlier. I really did. But it’s the thought that counts.

I had the best intentions when I began work in October, and have slowly made what I believe to be significant progress given the circumstances, as the project has been narrowly constrained by multiple, immovable factors:

1) My Fans

I am apparently so incredibly awesome and compelling that my pint-sized fans cannot bear the thought of me leaving the room. Not to go to the bathroom, wash dishes, get diapers, or anything else that takes longer than five seconds. The Experts call this “separation anxiety.” I call it “the reason I can’t get anything done around the house unless I want an improvisational high-pitched duet as a soundtrack.” Due to sharp drills and screwdrivers and the same hazardous cabinet contents I’m trying to bar from their tiny, inquisitive hands, I can’t have them climbing all over me while I install latchery. Keeping them in the room with me as I work necessitates restrictive holding cells such as Pack ‘n’ Plays and Exersaucers, but they are proficiently crawling their way to walking any day now, and thus assertively refuse any restraints in efforts normally attributed to Wild Horses and Freebirds and Eyes of Tigers. These factors all imply that the ideal baby-proofing window is during a Nap Overlap or Ni-Night Time. Aside from the fact that a Nap Overlap itself is rare, the slightest of sounds from a pin dropping to a grizzly bear/man hybrid slamming a car door can wake them, so firing up the drill while they’re asleep is simply ill-advised.
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2) My Schedule

Two of my weekdays are spent on campus studying in preparation for world domination. I have not yet taken my program’s Building and Remotely Controlling Your Own Robot Henchman 101 class, so baby-proofing production grinds to an unfortunate halt on these days. The remaining three weekdays are dedicated to house-husbanding and twin-wrangling, which, as I just mentioned, are not conducive to accomplishing anything but avoiding tantrums and occasionally escaping for a guerrilla laundry load. This leaves the weekends, the only time we are together as a family, during which we spend quality time driving around town running errands, and every once in a while, pretending we have a social life. This aspect has recently been amplified by…

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Elmo

An Open Letter to Elmo

ElmoOh, hi, Loyal Readers! Welcome to Twinfamy’s World! John is so happy to see you, and so are John’s Twins.

Can you guess what John is thinking about today? That’s right–Elmo!

You know, Elmo!

John has been watching Sesame Street with John’s Twins for a few months now and John has learned a lot about Elmo, but John has noticed some things about Elmo that confuse John. Unlike Elmo, John has no self-aware drawers and doesn’t have a family of mimes lurking outside John’s window who are always waiting with a smile when “Shade” goes up, so John wondered how to find out more about Elmo’s Worldview.

Then, suddenly, John had a spectacular idea–John should write Elmo a letter!

Here is John’s letter to Elmo:

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Dear Elmo,

First of all, John wants to say that John is a huge fan of Elmo’s, and has been ever since John was just a little boy. John remembers when Elmo got his first big break on Sesame Street, starting with only a few special guest appearances, but look at Elmo now! Elmo is the star! Yaaaaay! Plus, whatever Elmo is doing to stay in shape must be working because Elmo doesn’t seem to have aged a day.

John knows that Elmo has haters who are angry about Elmo taking Sesame Street by storm, “stealing” the spotlight away from traditional Street Performers like Big Bird, Oscar, Bert, Ernie, and especially Grover, who–as a result of Elmo’s coup de cutest–has retreated into an even more deluded version of his Super Grover alter-ego, trying way too hard to make himself relevant by unnecessarily upgrading his superhero uniform to “2.0” status and constantly asserting himself as “cute” in a futile, passive-aggressive attempt to dethrone Elmo’s natural, organic cuteness. John will even admit to agreeing with the Anti-Elmo League for a while, but now that John is a Loyal Viewer, John gets it.

Super Grover 2.0

Super Grover 2.0 unleashes the power of overcompensation.

Elmo is a natural born entertainer. Eternal optimism, a curious thirst for life, and genuine care for one’s fellow monster make Elmo hard NOT to love–so much so that people are even willing to overlook Elmo speaking exclusively in the third person and avoiding pronouns except the occasional “he” when talking about Elmoself, in order to avoid a rapid-fire, five-“Elmo” sentence. (Did Elmo notice John is doing the same thing in this letter? John wonders if John can get away with it.)

In fact, Elmo is so captivating that John DVRs Sesame Street every day because John often finds the one way John and John’s wife can afford 15 minutes to eat dinner without shrieking banshee interruptions is by putting on “Elmo’s World” for John’s loinfruits. John realizes the “World” is really intended for older viewers, but John’s Twins just adore Elmo and always kick their little feet when they hear the “Elmo’s World Theme Song.”

Which brings John to the reason for this letter.

John knows that Elmo and John are friends because Elmo has told John so in numerous grand, on-air gestures, so since Elmo and John are friends, John feels comfortable asking Elmo just a few earnest queries about the “Elmo’s World Theme Song.”

See, Elmo, John is sure you realize how unbelievably catchy the song is. It was a runaway success in its first incarnation as “Elmo’s Song,” and as “Elmo’s World” has become arguably the Street’s most popular segment, the ditty has become engrained–tattooed even–in the consciousness of parents and children everywhere. John wonders if–when Elmo was writing the song–he acquired government funding for a team of musically-inclined scientists to discover the most irresistibly infectious permutation of notes possible, or maybe had Paul McCartney or Neil Diamond ghost-write it, or even is hiding a resurrected John Lennon somewhere on the set (Oscar’s can?).

John will pause now for Elmo to imagine Neil Diamond singing “Elmo’s World.” Legendary.

Neil Diamond

The B-Side could be "Elmo Am... Elmo Said."

John thinks Elmo should get on the phone with Elmo’s agent and make that happen.

Anyway, Elmo, John’s point is the song is addictive. While home with the Twins, John finds himself involuntarily and spontaneously belting out “Elmo’s Song” as if under a spell, and even writing and performing John’s own off-the-cuff verses.

But that’s not even John’s real complaint.

Elmo, John has issue with the lyrics.

La la la-la, la la la-la, Elmo’s World

La la la-la, la la la-la, Elmo’s World

Elmo loves his goldfish,

His crayon, too.

That’s Elmo’s World.

John thinks it will help if John breaks it down.

La la la-la, la la la-la…

Okay, now this makes sense. Not only does this hearken back to the old, classic origin of the song; non-word, sung syllables have proven to be an excellent avenue to a solid hook, as they are easy to remember and facilitate sing-alongs. Look at the beginning of J. Geils Band’s “Centerfold” and the climactic end of The Beatles’ “Hey Jude.” With this in mind, John is already singing along with Elmo after a single “La.”

…Elmo’s World

Elmo's World

Next, Elmo illuminates his Loyal Viewers as to what is happening. Elmo is inviting Elmo’s Loyal Viewers into “Elmo’s World.” Elmo will assumedly proceed to describe what the journey into “Elmo’s World” will be like. Elmo is doing a great job so far!

Elmo loves his goldfish,

According to Elmo’s argument, the first phenomenon to expect in “Elmo’s World” is the love of a pet goldfish. Elmo still has John’s attention here, because this lyric also fits. It is no secret that Elmo loves Dorothy, and rightly so. John is not a big fish guy, but would convert if John had a goldfish who could generate aquarium sculptures with her fish-mind powers, too.

Elmo and Dorothy

Dorothy fashions a massive-eared fish...with her MIND!

Where did Elmo get Dorothy? Does Dorothy have any relatives that John could adopt? Now, John could point out the rare use of a pronoun in this line, but that’s not a big deal. It would disrupt the fluidity, anyway.

His crayon, too.

There it is, Elmo–the problematic line, the one that keeps John up at night, wondering WHY? It’s definitely apparent that Elmo is a crayon enthusiast. In fact, Elmo’s entire house seems to be constructed from them. But Elmo, John never sees you actually use the crayon. John assumes that possibly, at some point, the crayon was used more frequently, but seldom does Elmo incorporate the crayon into “Elmo’s World” nowadays.

Elmo has already said that Elmo loves his goldfish–why not issue a shout-out to other entities in “Elmo’s World” who help Elmo every day? What about Mr. Noodle, his brother Mr. Noodle, and his sister Ms. Noodle, who realize they are not very bright, but still, every episode, try to answer Elmo’s questions, only to be met with ridicule from voice-over children?

Mr. Noodle

He may not have much going on in his noodle, but he's a great sport.

What about “Drawer” who always helps Elmo learn more about what Elmo is thinking about? (Maybe Drawer keeps knocking Elmo over because Drawer is indignant.)

Because it’s a theme song, Elmo only has a short amount of time to encapsulate “Elmo’s World,” and the crayon simply isn’t part of it.

Then, Elmo, the song just ends.

That’s Elmo’s World

No, Elmo, it isn’t. That’s not “Elmo’s World.” Elmo implies that Elmo has summarized the World, but Elmo has only scratched the surface and wasted limited song real estate on a nonessential element.

John hopes this doesn’t upset Elmo, but John just can’t wrap John’s head around it, and because John still busts the song around the house as if in a musical, John is faced with this dilemma every time John sings about that darn crayon.

Please, Elmo. Don’t leave John hanging like this. Why is that line in Elmo’s song?

John has a feeling Elmo understands and thanks Elmo for hearing John out. John looks forward to Elmo’s response.

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Love,

John Pseudonymous

Author & CEO, Twinfamy

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Twinfamy Logo 2.0

That's Twinfamy's World.

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Loyal Reader may also enjoy:

Don't Fear the Teether   The Unveiling   I Need Some Space (The Final Frontier) OR Twin Wars: Episode 1 - Taunt of the Tauntaun

If not, John is still so happy to see you!

Foot Pillow

Rip Van Twinkle

Foot Pillow

The best available pillow, a five-dollar gem we have been placing on the floor as a booster for our kids’ dangling feet.

This past week was utterly exhausting.  My wife and I have gotten into what we think to be a phenomenal rhythm given the fact that we’re simultaneously raising twice the children most do, but it was derailed by several unavoidable circumstances, and we have literally spent every scarce free moment sleeping.  Among these disturbances in The Force were: childcare conflicts, altered work schedules (including me taking 2.5 days off work for a preseason exhibition of the stay-at-home fathering bidness), a visit from the Teething Fairy, and a raging deathmatch with an uncommon—possibly zombified—housefly.

So please forgive me, O Loyal Reader, for neglecting you.  I know our relationship is still new and exciting, and you may even still feel those first-date jitters as you savor this page.  Fear not, for as a result of the past half-fortnight, multiple twincidents are in gestation.  I’ve just really gotten into this Rip Van Winkle impression.  (I have the week-long beard to prove it.)  In fact, in attempting to report these late-breaking developments, I even found myself a victim of the trite, unrealistic, melodramatic Hollywood cliché of literally falling asleep at my keyboard.

While mind-blowing twincidents exploring the aforementioned topics are forthcoming, in the spirit of the week, I thought I’d offer a portrait of its haze—my Sunday afternoon nap.

I’ve never been a napper, or even a sleeper for that matter.  While I recognize that as a human I need sleep, I’d prefer not to.  There are so many amazing things to experience in the world, and to me, sleep has always felt so…idle.  My parents could tell you that even when I was a strapping young whippersnapper, they’d find me with my light on at 3 a.m. (even—*GASP*—on a school night!), reading such literary classics as the Choose Your Own Adventure Series and The Uncanny X-Men.  “I wasn’t tired,” I’d say.  Even with the arrival of the Twins and occasional sleepless nights, my body rarely needs a break aside from normal nighttime sleep.

This means that when I do decide I need a nap, you’d better let me.  My wife knows this, and heeds this commandment religiously.  This afternoon, however, there was some red tape involved in securing said nap.

I had just returned from the grocery store, finished putting our bounty away, and collapsed onto the couch.  “So I think I do want to take that nap.”

She had noticed my fatigue earlier in the day and gently suggested that my less-than-chipper demeanor might necessitate a siesta.  I had decided that since we had no food, I’d rather get groceries done first because I’m even more fun when I’m hungry.  “I feel myself starting to get annoyed about stupid things.  Like, at the store, I almost flipped out when the lady in front of me in the dairy aisle couldn’t figure out which yogurt defined her as a person.”

My wife, who was holding my son, smiled sweetly, sensing the impending doom if I stayed awake.  “Well, she (our daughter) is down for a nap in our room, so I don’t think you should go in there.”  This is because I am a champion snorer.  I was even up for a Grammy in the “Snoring—Short Form” category last year.  My snoring would undoubtedly wake my daughter who, unfortunately, has inherited her father’s sleeping habits.  Her thirst for stimulation makes any interruptions in her sleep particularly traumatic—for us, not her.

Straightening up my wriggling son, his frog legs kicking spastically, she continued.  “He just woke up a half hour ago, so it probably won’t be quiet out here.  You can crash on the couch out here if you want, but I can’t promise he won’t scream his head off.”  My son is proficient at this, especially in extremely short, unexpected bursts.  There’s already Grammy buzz for when he’s eligible.  He’s his father’s son.

“I guess I could try,” I replied, really attempting to convince myself it would work.

“We need another bed,” she mused, looking around the room, as if hoping for one to appear, like in a terrible, low-budget mattress commercial.

“What about the air mattress?”

“Where would we put it?”

“Maybe in the Cluster Room.”  The Cluster Room is our only spare room, which has become more of a closet.  Home to our towering bookshelves, furniture dethroned by baby paraphernalia, and a Rock Band drum controller, it’s quite the clusterf**k.  (Hence the name.)

“No,” I realized.  “The pump would wake her up anyway.  Maybe I could take the crib in the kids’ room,” I snarked.

She chuckled.  “Or their floor.”

“Yay.”

“Can you think of a better idea?”

“Not really,” I sighed.

With that, I took the best available pillow, a five-dollar gem we let guests sleep on and have more recently been placing on the floor under our Exersaucer and jumper as a booster for our kids’ dangling feet so they can actually use them.  I scoured it for poopy-diaper-blowout debris, and turned to my wife.  “So are you coming?”

“Why?”

“Well, aren’t you gonna swaddle me and sing me a song?”

“Go to sleep.”

“I’m turning the monitor on.  If you don’t hear me, just make sure I’m not suffocating under the blanket.”

“Good night.”

When I opened the door, I heard the kids’ Sound Machine (we have been unable to confirm whether or not it is from Miami) still hissing white noise from my son’s last nap, and switched it to the “Womb” setting.  Just for funsies.

Emptying my pockets, I camped out on the floor, and then decided, of course, to outline the whole occurrence for this very blog entry on my phone before actually attempting sleep.  Even when I’m beat, I fight it.

As I finally closed my eyes, the Sunday-afternoon dread flooded in.  I realized that I had still not figured out what the hell I’d be teaching all week; that the stack of neglected grading on my desk would be growing another story if I didn’t tackle it soon; that I have extra work projects to which I probably shouldn’t have committed waiting for me, and thus little desire to do them.

But then I realized that even if I wanted to put a dent in any of this, I couldn’t handle any of it as exhausted as I was.  So sleep would have to come first.  Plus, I remembered that I am trained in improvisational comedy, reaffirming my self-awesomeness at making stuff up as I go–at finishing sentences I’ve started without knowing how they’ll end.  And that’s when I drifted off…

Two glorious hours later, I woke up with a stiff neck to the sound of my daughter throwing a hissy.

Game on.