Tagged: The Force

Bringing Balance to the Meal

Twinfamy Comics #8 - Bringing Balance to the Meal

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Toddler Parkour

The Pseudonymous Family is moving to a new house this week. Although our current residence has served us well, it leaves little space for my wife and me to chase our little Ewoks around and has an air conditioner that was installed around the time Return of the Jedi was released. This does not bode well in the 115-degree Arizona summer, as it runs constantly and sh!tily and still does not sufficiently cool the house.

Accordingly, we’re very much looking forward to our new place’s additional square footage, reduced electricity bill, and gargantuan master bedroom closet organizer (a feature my wife literally dances about at its mere mention).

As we’ve been packing up the house, the Twins have been in rare form, no doubt thrown off by the disturbance in The Force due to their constantly-changing surroundings. While my daughter has fully integrated the word “No” into her vocabulary (Yeah. I’m in trouble.), my son has begun to test physical boundaries, exploring the limits of both furniture he’s allowed on and his own body. In fact, once we’d emptied the bookshelf in his bedroom the other day, we discovered a new talent of his, as illustrated by the following footage:

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My son's stuffed Pluto

Ruff-Ruff Down

Santa Monica Pier

We should have known better.

I don’t know why we expected our son to make it all day on an outing to Santa Monica Pier without a flip-out. With t-minus two days until our big trip to California, he had spiked a fever and started barking with croup, but we didn’t have any choice but to go with it. Bags were packed, hotels were booked, and my wife’s vacation days were locked in.

And so here we were at the Pier, fielding a high-decibel complaint from him as he refused to walk, be carried, or sit in the stroller. My wife and I took one look at each other and knew what needed to be done–get the f*ck out of there and get him a nap.

But first, we needed to calm him down so as to mobilize him.

As is customary, we looked for “Ruh-Ruh” (a toddler pronunciation of “Ruff-Ruff,” which is what our son calls his favorite toy, a stuffed Pluto). Surely, I thought, his go-to plush canine would again bring balance to The Force. But when I reached for its usual place in the diaper bag, I came up empty-handed. I dug through each pocket and checked the storage pouches on each umbrella stroller, but still no Ruff-Ruff.

My son's stuffed Pluto

“Hey,” I projected to our caravan of travelers, including my wife’s mother, stepfather, brother, sister, and grandmother. (We’d taken turns pushing the Twins’ strollers all day, so anyone could have had it.) “Where’s Pluto?”

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Foot Pillow

Rip Van Twinkle

Foot Pillow

The best available pillow, a five-dollar gem we have been placing on the floor as a booster for our kids’ dangling feet.

This past week was utterly exhausting.  My wife and I have gotten into what we think to be a phenomenal rhythm given the fact that we’re simultaneously raising twice the children most do, but it was derailed by several unavoidable circumstances, and we have literally spent every scarce free moment sleeping.  Among these disturbances in The Force were: childcare conflicts, altered work schedules (including me taking 2.5 days off work for a preseason exhibition of the stay-at-home fathering bidness), a visit from the Teething Fairy, and a raging deathmatch with an uncommon—possibly zombified—housefly.

So please forgive me, O Loyal Reader, for neglecting you.  I know our relationship is still new and exciting, and you may even still feel those first-date jitters as you savor this page.  Fear not, for as a result of the past half-fortnight, multiple twincidents are in gestation.  I’ve just really gotten into this Rip Van Winkle impression.  (I have the week-long beard to prove it.)  In fact, in attempting to report these late-breaking developments, I even found myself a victim of the trite, unrealistic, melodramatic Hollywood cliché of literally falling asleep at my keyboard.

While mind-blowing twincidents exploring the aforementioned topics are forthcoming, in the spirit of the week, I thought I’d offer a portrait of its haze—my Sunday afternoon nap.

I’ve never been a napper, or even a sleeper for that matter.  While I recognize that as a human I need sleep, I’d prefer not to.  There are so many amazing things to experience in the world, and to me, sleep has always felt so…idle.  My parents could tell you that even when I was a strapping young whippersnapper, they’d find me with my light on at 3 a.m. (even—*GASP*—on a school night!), reading such literary classics as the Choose Your Own Adventure Series and The Uncanny X-Men.  “I wasn’t tired,” I’d say.  Even with the arrival of the Twins and occasional sleepless nights, my body rarely needs a break aside from normal nighttime sleep.

This means that when I do decide I need a nap, you’d better let me.  My wife knows this, and heeds this commandment religiously.  This afternoon, however, there was some red tape involved in securing said nap.

I had just returned from the grocery store, finished putting our bounty away, and collapsed onto the couch.  “So I think I do want to take that nap.”

She had noticed my fatigue earlier in the day and gently suggested that my less-than-chipper demeanor might necessitate a siesta.  I had decided that since we had no food, I’d rather get groceries done first because I’m even more fun when I’m hungry.  “I feel myself starting to get annoyed about stupid things.  Like, at the store, I almost flipped out when the lady in front of me in the dairy aisle couldn’t figure out which yogurt defined her as a person.”

My wife, who was holding my son, smiled sweetly, sensing the impending doom if I stayed awake.  “Well, she (our daughter) is down for a nap in our room, so I don’t think you should go in there.”  This is because I am a champion snorer.  I was even up for a Grammy in the “Snoring—Short Form” category last year.  My snoring would undoubtedly wake my daughter who, unfortunately, has inherited her father’s sleeping habits.  Her thirst for stimulation makes any interruptions in her sleep particularly traumatic—for us, not her.

Straightening up my wriggling son, his frog legs kicking spastically, she continued.  “He just woke up a half hour ago, so it probably won’t be quiet out here.  You can crash on the couch out here if you want, but I can’t promise he won’t scream his head off.”  My son is proficient at this, especially in extremely short, unexpected bursts.  There’s already Grammy buzz for when he’s eligible.  He’s his father’s son.

“I guess I could try,” I replied, really attempting to convince myself it would work.

“We need another bed,” she mused, looking around the room, as if hoping for one to appear, like in a terrible, low-budget mattress commercial.

“What about the air mattress?”

“Where would we put it?”

“Maybe in the Cluster Room.”  The Cluster Room is our only spare room, which has become more of a closet.  Home to our towering bookshelves, furniture dethroned by baby paraphernalia, and a Rock Band drum controller, it’s quite the clusterf**k.  (Hence the name.)

“No,” I realized.  “The pump would wake her up anyway.  Maybe I could take the crib in the kids’ room,” I snarked.

She chuckled.  “Or their floor.”

“Yay.”

“Can you think of a better idea?”

“Not really,” I sighed.

With that, I took the best available pillow, a five-dollar gem we let guests sleep on and have more recently been placing on the floor under our Exersaucer and jumper as a booster for our kids’ dangling feet so they can actually use them.  I scoured it for poopy-diaper-blowout debris, and turned to my wife.  “So are you coming?”

“Why?”

“Well, aren’t you gonna swaddle me and sing me a song?”

“Go to sleep.”

“I’m turning the monitor on.  If you don’t hear me, just make sure I’m not suffocating under the blanket.”

“Good night.”

When I opened the door, I heard the kids’ Sound Machine (we have been unable to confirm whether or not it is from Miami) still hissing white noise from my son’s last nap, and switched it to the “Womb” setting.  Just for funsies.

Emptying my pockets, I camped out on the floor, and then decided, of course, to outline the whole occurrence for this very blog entry on my phone before actually attempting sleep.  Even when I’m beat, I fight it.

As I finally closed my eyes, the Sunday-afternoon dread flooded in.  I realized that I had still not figured out what the hell I’d be teaching all week; that the stack of neglected grading on my desk would be growing another story if I didn’t tackle it soon; that I have extra work projects to which I probably shouldn’t have committed waiting for me, and thus little desire to do them.

But then I realized that even if I wanted to put a dent in any of this, I couldn’t handle any of it as exhausted as I was.  So sleep would have to come first.  Plus, I remembered that I am trained in improvisational comedy, reaffirming my self-awesomeness at making stuff up as I go–at finishing sentences I’ve started without knowing how they’ll end.  And that’s when I drifted off…

Two glorious hours later, I woke up with a stiff neck to the sound of my daughter throwing a hissy.

Game on.