Tagged: shower

The Tap-Dancing Butt Crack

The warm water ran down my back, washing away 36 hours of sweat and grime. I systematically defunkified each of my body’s nether regions with my extremely manly loofah and inhaled the warm, misty scent of my 2-in-1 shampoo.

It was beautiful.

You should have been there. (But it’s probably for the best that you weren’t, because I was naked and that would have been awkward for you, due to the devastatingly chiseled one-pack bulging from my abs.)

As a parent of twins, I’ve grown to truly appreciate the quiet, reflective alone time a shower buys me, and twelve days into being a parent of three, I was absolutely loving the opportunity to finally hear myself think for five freaking seconds.

As you can probably imagine, adding a newborn to the mix has turned the Pseudonymous household into even more of a zoo than it already was. My wife and I settled on fielding the incessant requests for Lego-building assistance and “another snack after diss one” from the Twins as our “new normal” about a year ago, but we’ve added some new floors to our funhouse with Baby Number Three. On top of our typical twinherding duties, my wife (who is also monumentally wiped out from breastfeeding) and I now also spend our days attempting to get our new addition on a suitable feeding/sleeping/not crying schedule–all the while shushing the Twins like two shaven Grinches as they excitedly play with their noisy new Christmas toys two inches from their slumbering sister.

How the Grinch Stole Christmas - Noise Noise Noise

(Artist’s Rendering)

Our meals consist of shoving granola bars and fast food into our faces the moment the opportunity arises, and while we fully intend to shower daily, it doesn’t always pan out.

Now, as I’m sure many parents will agree with, none of this is all that difficult when you’re well-rested, but when you have a newborn, the concept of “well-rested” becomes your own personal Everest. I think my wife’s Ob-Gyn at the hospital put it best as we were getting discharged: “I’m sure you guys already know what you’re in for, but sleep deprivation is literally used to torture prisoners. Sleep when you can, and get all the help you can to make that happen.”

And we have had help–both my family and my wife’s have kicked SO much ass. But still, at some point, our help has to go home…

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Buddy and the Great Glass Water Sprayer

“Are you sure you don’t want to come in, Buddy?” my wife called from inside the shower.

I’d love to say the offer was directed at me in a completely different context (Giggity!), but in this case she was addressing my son.

On that particular evening my wife and I had decided that we simply were NOT into the whole bathtime ordeal, so in an effort to mix up the normal nighttime routine (and to get the kid-cleaning over with quickly) we opted for a co-shower approach, with my wife being the Wet Cop and me the Dry Cop.

My daughter, who thoroughly enjoys the shower, had already been sanitized and was now playing with her cherished set of three tiny blue rubber duckies on the shower floor, quacking happily to herself. My son, however, stood a few feet back from the glass shower door, scowling at it while wearing nothing but a diaper.

He shook his head. “No. No like shower. Scared.”

For some reason, my son has a shower phobia. I couldn’t tell you why, because he loves all other aquatic activities–baths, hand-washing, swimming, sprinklers, and especially our new water table, which, within his first ten minutes of use, prompted him to loudly declare the following rave review: “I’M HAVING FUN!!! I’M HAVING FUN!!!”

Water Table

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Happy Stars and Arm-Bitches

As I finished rinsing off in the shower (feel free to imagine me with a six-pack instead of the slight gut I’ve developed from drinking them), my son requested one last drawing on the shower’s fogged-up glass walls. “‘Nother one, Daddy. Happy star.”

This is our new fun thing we do when Daddy showers–I take drawing requests while he stands on the other side of the glass, giddily retracing them with his fingers and going apeshit crazy if Daddy doesn’t draw a new one at least every thirty seconds. This, of course, extends my already-too-leisurely-for-my-wife’s-taste showering time. (See, I like to ease into my morning by staring blankly into space for ten minutes until I remember, Oh right, I’m in the shower and should probably get started on the whole cleaning thing.) And I’m sure she very much enjoys being the bad guy and reminding the two little boys in her life to stop goofing around with shower-wall artwork because we’re already running late. (Love you, babe!)

However, on this particular morning there was plenty of time for happy stars because my wife had left to run errands with my daughter, giving me a rare opportunity for some father-son quality time. Sure, I get to spend plenty of time with my kids since I’m home with them for half of the week, but 99% of that is with both competing for my attention. Seldom is anything ever all about one of my kids, and a lot of the time I’m reacting to whoever’s more cranky, hungry, or likely to climb a high chair and cannonball into the kitchen tile. That’s why my wife and I make an effort to split up and spend some one-on-one time with each of them.

It’s always such a blast. Every time, I notice new things about whichever kid I’m with–new words they’ve learned, nuances about their personalities–things that are harder to pick up on when I’m splitting my attention between them. And it’s during these times that I realize how quickly they’re growing into two independent, very different little people.

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Boston Tea Party

Big Mother is Watching

Boston Tea Party

At the Boston Tea Party, there were no baby monitors.

“Okay, so it’s all set up. If you keep it plugged in, you can just leave it on.  You don’t even need to touch it!” I winked in full infomercial swagger.  As my school year winds down, my mother is wrangling the kids on days my wife and I are both working, so I was giving her a crash course on not touching the baby monitor so she would actually be able to use it all day.

“Just the way I like it,” she snickered.  My mother’s technological savvy is just a cut above my four-month-old children’s, so she appreciates when I minimize her button-pushing obligations.

My daughter furrowed her brow and “Guh guh guh-ed” at Grandma through the nipple in her mouth, which translates to, “You shut your mouth while you’re feeding me.”  She has a strict policy when eating: “No talking and no eye contact—I’m focusing.”

I have attempted to implement this same policy in a reciprocal manner.  Whenever I’m seizing a precious free moment to shovel my entire meal stomachward in one gulp and she “interrupts” me, I’ll point an accusatory finger and throw that “Guh guh guh” right back in her face, but it’s an exercise in futility akin to expecting quality from a Kate Hudson movie.  I’ve even tried to sit her down and explain to her that she’s holding me to a double standard, but then she’ll do the thing where she smiles so widely and intensely that her tongue trembles, and her damp, elated eyes literally sparkle.  So, as the cuteness melts my face off, the only thing I can say to that is, “I’ll get you next time, Gadget!  Next time!”

Dr. Claw

"I'll get you next time, Gadget! Next time!"

Making sure my son was secure in his jumper, I took a step towards my bedroom, still dazed from his 4 a.m. wake-up call.  (“Hey, Dad!  Watch this!  See this thing on my foot?  If I pull it, it comes off!  You gotta try this!  Oh…were you asleep?”)  I then realized I should see if my mom needed anything before I passed the munchkin baton, especially because I now realize she endured this madness for me when I was one of them.

“Are you good?  I was gonna shower.”

The proud grandma cradled my daughter, whose unrelenting cuteness had begun to melt her face off as well.  “I’m more than good.”

Super.

“How are you feeling?”  I asked my wife, who was getting ready for work. She hasn’t been feeling so hot this week, due to a debilitating cold.  It’s the first time either of us has fallen ill since the Twins’ Earthen premiere, and it’s been daunting running on fewer cylinders than usual with the added two miniature, dependent cylinders.

“Alright, I guess,” she replied.  “I don’t feel any worse than yesterday but I don’t feel any better either.”

It is a national day of mourning when she’s sick.  I’ve always felt it’s better me than her.  As a victim of terrible allergies for my entire life, I was a sickly child, always carrying tissues in one pocket and cough drops in the other, while my bastard friends always had room for cool things, like Swiss Army Knives and G.I. Joes.  Don’t get me wrong—I despise being sick as much as anyone—I’ve just gotten used to it.  My wife, not so much.

Plus, because she is the organized one—I like to think of myself as the “idea” guy—when she is sick, bills are neglected, appointments are forgotten, and basically any planning ahead whatsoever does not happen because I find thrilling new ways to drop the ball when I sub in.  On the other hand, if I’m sick, the most devastating tragedy is usually that our iPods are not perfectly synced with our iTunes libraries.

But I am an excellent caregiver.  As a soon-to-be-former middle school teacher, filthy tweens have blessed me with nearly every illness there is to have over the years, aside from the ones you need a vagina for.  This—paired with the fact that my mother is a pharmacist—has yielded a fine assortment of remedies for every occasion.  One that I swear by is hot tea, especially when you unload about a half-bottle of honey into it.  (According to the leading e-mail forwards, honey has transformative healing powers and is said to be the best remedy for sore throats, unrelenting coughs, and even the occasional Saturday Night Fever.)

I’ve made tea for my wife every night this week.  This is because I am the world’s greatest husband.

So on that fateful morning, upon hearing that my wife was still not feeling well, I inquired, “Do you have teabags at work?”

“Yeah,” she sighed, frustrated. She had that defeated look in her eyes that you see in uncoordinated people trying to play Guitar Hero.  Something needed to be done to lift her spirits.  Something epic.  And as I was undressing to get in the shower, I decided to be hilarious.

“Would it make you feel better if I teabagged you right now?”  For those who are unfamiliar with the act of teabagging, go ahead and Google it, and I’m sure you’ll find your answer.  It involves likening a certain region of the male anatomy to a “teabag” while “steeping” it in a certain cavity of another consenting adult—in my case, a smokin’ hot female.

She finished blowing her nose and just stared at me.  “Are you kidding?”

Well, of course I was kidding.  As you remember, I was being hilarious.  But that’s not to say I would have been upset if she had been up for it, either.

“You’re smiling on the inside,” I quipped.  Then I got one on the outside.  Boo-yah.  My mission accomplished, I jumped in the shower.

Stop picturing me naked.

Just a few minutes later, my wife came creeping back in.  As she peeked into the shower, I wondered if my beverage-innuendo-driven proposal had been accepted.  Then I noticed an odd look on her face.

“What’s going on?” I asked.

“Um… Your mom…” She was whispering.  “You know the monitor over there?”  She pointed at one of the cribs in our room.

Teabag

"I think she heard...about the teabagging."

“Yeah?”

“You forgot to turn it off.  I think she heard…about the teabagging.”

“Oh sh*t!  Really?”

“Yeah.”

“Wait, do you think she even knows what it means?”

“I don’t know!”  She hissed.  “Do you want me to ask her?”

“Of course not!”

Several days later, the topic has not been breached.  We’re okay with that.